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Articles

TO-DO: Winter Session

  • TYPOGRAPHY/FONT STYLEGUIDE DONE: 16 Jan 2013
  • BODY COPY DUMMIES
  • FINISH MAIN SITE COMING SOON PAGE 
  • DRAFT: TITLE SEQUENCE MOTION GRAPHIC
  • VIDEO TITLE CARD
  • WATERMARK BUG FOR PHOTOS/VIDEO DONE: 13 Jan 2013
  • PROJECT BUSINESS CARDS
  • GALLERY/EXHIBIT PRESENTATION SKETCHES
  • SECURE SPACE FOR MAY’S FIRST FRIDAY
  • FIGURE OUT SOCIAL MEDIA PLAN, KICKSTARTER??
  • DRAFT: ARTIST’S STATEMENT
  • DRAFT: “ANATOMY OF AN EPIDEMIC” MOTION GRAPHIC
  • WORK ON DATA VIS PROJECTS DONE: 16 Jan 2013
  • PROJECT CALENDAR FOR SPRING 2013  DONE: 12 Dec 2012
Images

CONTACT SHEET: 96th Foresters’ Ball

Foresters' Ball: Link to full image gallery
Click on the image to browse the full gallery.

The Foresters’ Ball is a HUGE event put on every year by the University of Montana’s College of Forestry and Conservation – it’s drawn coverage from Rolling Stone and Playboy and is one of the biggest student-run events in the country (I forget where I read that little tidbit … should probably look that up – not that I doubt it’s veracity!).

Every year in the spring, Forestry students turn one of the gyms on campus (traditionally they use Schreiber Gym, which is in the old ROTC building and needed some fire code upgrades, so the Ball was moved to the auxiliary volleyball gyms in the Adams Center) into a turn-of-the-century logging town, complete with a saloon, a wedding chapel, a chow hall, a jail, and, of course, a stage and dance floor.  This year the school wanted the Ball Committee to make the event more educational and family-friendly, so the floor plan also included several displays dedicated to the history of forest resource management, the timber industry, and the forestry program at UM.

The 2013 Ball was the fifth Ball I’ve attended and photographed – but the first one that I’ve attended as JUST a photographer.  In years past I’ve usually been having too much fun to worry about shooting – meaning my image catalog for this project contains a massive collection of construction photos, but only a handful of the event itself.  This year definitely remedied that lack – I’m super happy with the images I was able to get.  I love rear-curtain flash!

Images

CONTACT SHEET: Yellowstone!

CONTACT SHEET: Yellowstone
Click on the image to browse the full gallery.

So this summer some friends of mine from New Zealand moved to Vancouver on a year-long work visa, and since they weren’t planning on flying home for the holidays I invited them down to spend Christmas at my folks’ house. I think they were pretty stoked to experience a traditional “white Christmas” – especially once I started babbling about some of the recreational options around the area, like, say, snowmobiling? Down in Yellowstone National Park?

So that’s how we spent Christmas Eve – EPIC day. I’m not entirely sure if I will be using any of these photos in the thesis project, but since I was shooting that day with my thesis in the back of my head (and was probably pretty annoying to our guide, who was really good about pointing out and talking about the different species of wildlife and plant life we saw … but some of his information on the beetle kill was crazy off-base) I decided to include these images in the DevLog.

Video

SAMPLE EDIT: Ron Cheever

Ron Cheever retired from logging after over 50 years in the woods.  [Filmed 25 November 2012 - Townsend, MT]

Video

SAMPLE EDIT: Tim Lahey

Tim Lahey is a planning forester with the Helena National Forest and Lewis & Clark National Forest. The Helena and Lewis & Clark forests are among the hardest hit areas in the current mountain pine beetle outbreak in Montana.  [Filmed 25 November 2012 - Helena, MT]

Images

GALLERY/EXHIBIT INSPO: Kim Thittichai’s “Layered Textiles”

"Layered Textiles" - Example #1
“Layered Textiles” – Example #1

Kim Thittichai’s Layered Textiles is a visual feast, especially to anyone who’s already a mixed media/arts-n-crafts junkie.

I’m still not entirely 100% sure how I want to put together a public exhibition to go along with the project’s website launch, but I AM 100% definitely positively certain that I want the physical exhibition to be super rich and textural and interactive and absorbing, just like the deep woods.  Layered Textiles has some incredibly beautiful examples that really embody that feeling: the thriving, breathing complexity, the bursts of color, the many layers of texture that beg to be run through you fingers.

Super inspiring to page through her book (click here for a selection of pages scanned into a .pdf) … will definitely be turning the kitchen table into an experimentation station over winter break to see what I can come up with for my own “forest” interpretations.

One image in particular (last page of the .pdf) that really pinged was an example of a textile collage that was built with different transparencies, and then shaped into a sort of lampshade.  The example in the book is easily read-able as a lamp … gorgeous, but not really as “interactive” as it could be … like, say, if the same implementation was taken on by a Media Arts student?  Looks like I also need to start playing with some Arduino boards and LEDs.  :)

"Layered Textiles" - Example #2
“Layered Textiles” – Example #2
Articles

Huh-Freaking-Zah.

Photo Log (Contact Sheets)
Photo Log (contact sheets)

I finished scanning in EVERY. SINGLE. IMAGE that was/could potentially be used in this project (79 rolls of film – negatives and slides, 35 mm and 120 mm – and counting) … encompassing the last 12 years of my life, adding up to over 3,500 images once the digital catalog of the last few years is added in.

That is all.  >.<

Articles

NOTES: “The Greatest Good,” USFS Centennial Film

[The Forest Service celebrated its centennial in 2005, and commemorated the occasion with a feature length film (packed with two discs worth of extras and behind the scenes featurettes) called "The Greatest Good."]

“… where conflicting interests must be reconciled, the question will always be decided from the standpoint of the greatest good of the greatest number in the long run.” – Gifford Pinchot, Chief Forester, 1905

public lands: “where we resolve our conflicting interests … an experiment that asks, ‘what is the greatest good?’ ”

18th & 19th century settlers:

  • natural resources seemed endless/limitless
  • trees were an obstacle (to development, agriculture) but timber was prized (sale for building)
  • early economy was built/based on timber

“timber famine” – late 1800s, forests of the east VERY depleted, looked west to satisfy demand

George Perkins Marsh, 1864 – compared deforestation and desertification of Mediterranean to “timber famine” of late 1800s

Pinchot family made their fortune with “cut and run” forestry – clearing landscape of forest in favor of farmland … “timber famine” prompted Pinchot family to change tactics, encouraged oldest son Gifford to become basically the first forester in the U.S.

More…

Video

Site Map Timelapse

Short timelapse taken while I mapped out the sitemap for Forest for the Trees and figured out how the individual pages would connect/link together …