// HIGHLIGHTS


News Photography



MEDIA: PHOTOGRAPHY

DATE: ONGOING

CLIENT: VARIOUS


This collection of images is from a mix of sources, incorporating work from my undergrad years (a few campus newspaper assignments in addition to course work), my time at the Poynter Institute, various newspaper jobs, and my internship with the U.S. Forest Service.


I wanted to feature two news packages from across my collected body of work as well. The first, embedded below, was captured and assembled as an assignment for a photo story class I took during my final year of journalism school.


2006 marked ten years since the reintroduction of wolves in Montana, and public opinion varied wildly on whether or not the project could be considered a success. I spoke with a handful of state wildlife officials to gather a fact-based rebuttal to the largely fear-based public voices of opposition, and visited a wolf sanctuary near Missoula to get some intimate photographs of the animal in question.


The finished photo story had to be laid out as a feature package in either a newspaper or a magazine, and be accompanied by a feature story.


 
Locations of collared wolves are monitored using radio frequencies.

Locations of collared wolves are monitored using radio frequencies.

Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks agent Liz Bradley listens to the ultrasound-like beeping of two collared wolves northwest of Missoula, Montana.
Collage of images from my Wolf Reintroduction photo story.

Left: Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks agent Liz Bradley listens to the ultrasound-like beeping of two collared wolves northwest of Missoula, Montana.
Middle: Teton, one of two gray wolves to call the wildlife sanctuary Wolfkeep home.
Top right: Montana state veterinarian Mark Atkinson checks the paws of a euthanized wolf for trap-related injuries. Bottom right: The skull and hide of every wolf that passes through the Wildlife Lab is saved for forensic and educational purposes.

The second news photo story I wanted to feature was produced while I was interning for the U.S. Forest Service. I spent almost three years at the Missoula Technology & Development Center, a research and development lab largely focused on leveraging technology to solve problems encountered by field employees.


One of the main research areas that MTDC staffers were studying was fire retardant - both the impact of the chemical on the environments it was used in, and the means of deploying it. All air tankers that are used to deploy retardant must be rigorously tested to make sure they can deliver their payload of retardant with reliable and targeted accuracy. My first summer at MTDC, we spent three weeks testing Neptune Aviation's newly outfitted BAe-146.


My main responsibility was capturing every single flight and retardant drop on video (both real time and high speed), so that we could later compare flight paths and time the drops. But for a few days of testing, I was set loose with a few DSLRs to cover the operation on the ground, photojournalism style. These photos were used illustratively in the final documentation that was prepared following the conclusion of the drop tests.


 
Retardant residue build-up over three weeks of drop testing.

Retardant residue build-up over three weeks of drop testing.


Collage of images from my Drop Testing photo story.
Samples are weighed and recorded to determine retardant dispersal over the grid.

Top left: Sample collection boxes are distributed along the grid. Bottom left: The Neptune BAe-146 makes another pass over the grid.
Middle: The Neptune BAe-146 releases its payload of fire retardant.
Right: Samples are weighed and recorded to determine retardant dispersal over the grid.